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Need a carpet cleaner in Lymm

Need a carpet cleaner who works in Lymm?

We all need that peace of mind when you need the best carpet cleaning experts in Lymm.

Would you say that it is now time to get your dirty carpets and upholstery, or your rugs cleaned?

We believe we are the best carpet cleaning company in Lymm. Having been in business now for our 17th year. We pride our business on ongoing training as well as gaining a vast experience cleaning all types of fabrics.

What Else can we do?

Not only are we ace at cleaning carpets, your leather upholstery, and other types of Sofa’s get a build-up of grease and dirt and of course your mattress.

So when did you last have your carpets cleaned?

Carpet cleaning Lymm is our passion. We love what we do, we take pride in our carpet cleaning skills , it’s what we do day in day out.

So don’t delay, we are only a phone call away to help you sort out your dirt dilemma.

Give us a call, text, or email us. We will answer you enquiry as quickly as possible.
A Little bit about the history of Lymm

In the year 1066, two manor halls existed being Lymm and Oughtington. The family which owned these estates were the De Lymms and they resided at Lymm Hall until around 1342. The estate was then passed via marriage to the Domvilles. The south west part of the parish was now owned by the Booth Family and they became known as Lymm Booth.

At around 1500 ad, the community was quite affluent even though the area was mainly agricultural. Local society remained this way until about the 16th Century when major changes took place being the start of an industrial development. Quarries became popular. The town also became popular with tanning, iron works, and powder making which grew over a 200 year period.

Bridgewater Canal was completed in 1761 which cuts through the village centre. This canal helped with growing the industrial businesses of the area, especially the cutting industry. Cottages were built for the local workers with the larger properties built for the owners of the industries.

Around 1820 there was an urgent need for more water supplies to cope with the industrial growth. Lymm dam was built which allowed for transport being re-routed which is now known as the A56.

Lymm today is due to the vast array of changes required for its inhabitants. The landscape is a wonderful feature, with Lymm dam and the vast array of tree lines. The village’s architecture goes back to the 19th century and yes a few exceptions. This includes Lymm Hall, the late Medieval Cross, which are associated with the Manchester Ship Canal

In spite of the fact that the emergence  of railroads in 1853 opened access to Manchester and the birth of the motorcar made it less demanding to drive to different towns and urban areas, Lymm neglected to develop as an industrial town. There was no coal, the waterpower was missing and it was too far away from the Mersey. The upside to this was that the village has kept its town appeal and this prompted it being a prevalent decision for individuals to live and visit.

Lymm Hall is an early 17th century medieval site with a moat. Originally surrounded by parkland and large estates, it is still an attractive site with many trees surrounding it.

Dane Bank House is one of
Lymm's most important buildings was completed in the 17th century. Parts of it still remain, but most of it is now Georgian. It has wonderful grounds, with an old estate wall and an old barn to name but a few of its attractions. These also date from the 17th century. The growth in the 19th century led to many Victorian houses which also adds to the character of the village.

Lymm Dam
In 1821-4 the steam was dammed for water and power for the industries. In the 1900s, avenues and bridges added to the character of it.
William Lever

The land was then owned by a man called William Lever who intended to make considerable changes to the area. It was he who constructed the large concrete bridge at the southern end of Lymm Dam known as the Crossfield Bridge. He was also accountable for the avenues which border Lymm Dam, these currently being Lakeside Road, The Avenue and the bridleway running along the eastern boundary of Lymm Dam. The avenues were planted with alternating Lombardy poplar and English elm trees. Lever had planned to use these avenues as part of a residential development to house his workers however, for reasons unknown, the houses were never built.

Lymm may be a tucked away village however lots of things happen in Lymm. To keep up to date with Lymm and is goings on why not visit Cheshire Life or Lymm Life Magazine.